Hackers Acquire Google Certificate, Could Hijack Gmail Accounts

Google Hacking Hackers News / Stories Privacy Attacks

Hackers have obtained a digital certificate good for any Google website from a Dutch certificate provider.

Google SSL Certificate

Criminals could use the certificate to conduct “man-in-the-middle” attacks targeting users of Gmail, Google’s search engine or any other service.

Attackers could poison DNS, present their site with the fake cert and bingo, they have the user’s credentials.

Man-in-the-middle attacks could also be launched via spam messages with links leading to a site posing as, say, the real Gmail. If recipients surfed to that link, their account login username and password could be hijacked.

Details of the certificate were posted on Pastebin last Saturday.

The SSL certificate is valid, and was issued by DigiNotar, a Dutch certificate authority, or CA.

It’s unclear whether the certificate was obtained because of a lack of oversight by DigiNotar or through a breach of the company’s certificate issuing website.

Given their ties to the government and financial sectors it’s extremely important to find out the scope of the breach as quickly as possible. The situation was reminiscent of a breach last March, when a hacker obtained certificates for some of the Web’s biggest sites, including Google and Gmail, Microsoft, Skype and Yahoo.

Then, Comodo said that nine certificates had been fraudulently issued after attackers used an account assigned to a company partner in southern Europe.

Initially, Comodo argued that Iran’s government may have been involved in the theft. Days later, however, a solo Iranian hacker claimed responsibility for stealing the SSL certificates.