Posts tagged: Facebook Hacking

Oct 21 2013

Facebook Data Mining Tool Uncovers Your Life

You know you shouldn’t post potentially damaging data on Facebook, but more often that not, your friends don’t think twice about it, and this can impact you even more than you think. At the Hack In The Box conference in Kuala Lumpur, security consultants Keith Lee and Jonathan Werrett from SpiderLabs revealed how a simple tool can enable anyone to find a comprehensive amount of data on any user.

Facebook Data Mining
Keith Lee and Jonathan Werrett during their presentation

To get the information, they created the aptly named FBStalker. This tool reverse-engineers the Facebook Graph and can find information on almost anyone. You don’t have to be a friend with someone on the network – the only thing that FBStalker needs to work is for parts of your posts to be marked as public. The tool will find things based on photos you’ve been tagged in, the comments you’ve put on other people’s posts, the things that you like, etc.

If you are tagged in a photo, we can assume you know the people you’re in the photo with. If you comment on a post, FBStalker knows there’s an association. Most people have an open friends list and this gives the tool a variety of people to target for more information. By looking at their posts and your interactions with them, it’s possible to understand how some of those people are important in your life.

Even though many users don’t use the Check-In function, it’s still possible to determine their favorite places to hang-out based on the tagged photos and posts from their friends. Just imagine the level of detail you can achieve and how that can help you if you want to mount a targeted social engineering attack against the user.

The first thing that came to mind when I learned about this tool was to ask if it’s a violation of Facebook’s terms of service. Werrett was expecting the question, he says with a smile: “The tool is basically automating what the user can do in the browser. We’re not using any APIs or unofficial ways of interacting with the interface. We’re using Graph Search to build-up this profile.”

FBStalker goes also a step further and provides private information about the targeted user that might not be obvious to others. It allows you to analyze the time when the person is online and, with time you are able to guess their sleep patterns and active hours.

This type of tool works well if you haven’t locked down your profile, but it can still work even if you have, provided that your friends haven’t locked down their profiles. You know the old saying – the chain is only as strong as its weakest link. With Facebook’s recent announcement that they are removing a privacy feature and that every user is going to be discoverable by name, things are getting increasingly harder to hide.

Even if your account is locked down, you can’t mark your profile picture as private. Once you change it and people like the picture, the attacker can start building a view of your friends list.

What can you do to protect yourself? The authors have a few suggestions: turn off location tracking and tighten your Facebook privacy settings. However, with the social networking giant increasingly removing privacy options, you may have trouble staying hidden.

Sep 02 2013

Facebook Vulnerability that Allowed any Photo to be Deleted Earns $12,500 Bounty

Facebook BountyAn Indian electronics and communications engineer who describes himself as a “security enthusiast with a passion for ethical hacking” has discovered a Facebook vulnerability that could have allowed for any photo on the site to be deleted without the owner’s knowledge.

Arul Kumar, a 21 year old from Tamil Nadu, discovered that he could delete any Facebook image within a minute, even from verified pages, all without any interaction from the user.

For his efforts in reporting the vulnerability to Facebook’s whitehat bug bounty program Kumar received a reward of $12,500.

The vulnerability that he discovered was based around exploiting the mobile version of the social network’s Support Dashboard, a portal that allows users to track the progress of any reports they make to the site, including highlighting photos that they believe should be removed.

Kumar explained his bug by using a demo account, as well as sending Facebook a proof of concept video in which he showed how he could have removed Mark Zuckerberg’s own photos from his album.

By following Facebook’s whitehat guidelines he was able to pick up his deserved bounty.

Jan 19 2012

Hacker Publishes Waves of Facebook Logins

Facebook Passwords LeakedA hacker who calls himself Hannibal has posted thousands of alleged login email addresses and passwords of Arab Facebook users.

Emails and passwords for the social network Facebook have been published on Pastebin. Hannibal claims he has more than 30 million credentials of Arab users that he will publish regularly.

The hacker backs Israel and said, “State of Israel, not to worry, you’re in the hands of the world’s best hacker that I am. I will continue to support the government of Israel will continue to attack the Arab countries.”

In addition to the Facebook details he claims that he has possession of 10 million bank accounts and four million credit card details, which he warns he will publish if Iran continues to threaten Israel.

The most recent post said, “Unfortunately today I received an email from Mohammad Reza Rahimi [an Iranian politician] who threatens that would raise most of his men to find me and kill me. I assure you Mr. Fool, you can keep looking as you want, you will not find me even if you have a staff of 1,000 people who search for and carry out search for information about me.”

A spokesman for Facebook said, “This does not represent a hack of Facebook or anyone’s Facebook profiles. We have spent time investigating the information and have determined less than a third of the credentials were valid and almost half weren’t associated with Facebook accounts.”

“Additionally, we have built robust internal systems that validate every single login to our site, regardless if the password is correct or not, to check for malicious activity. By analysing every single login to the site we have added a layer of security that protects our users from threats both known and unknown. Beyond our engineering teams that build tools to block malicious activity, we also have a dedicated enforcement team that seeks to identify those responsible for threats and works with our legal team to ensure appropriate consequences follow.”

Jan 18 2012

Carberp Trojan Steals e-Cash Vouchers from Facebook Users

A new configuration of the Carberp Trojan that targets Facebook users to commit financial fraud. Unlike previous Facebook attacks designed to steal user credentials from the log-in page, this version attempts to steal money by duping the user into divulging an e-cash voucher.

Carberp replaces any Facebook page the user navigates to with a fake page notifying the victim that his/her Facebook account is “temporarily locked”. The page asks the user for their first name, last name, email, date of birth, password and a Ukash 20 euro (approximately $25 US) voucher number to “confirm verification” of their identity and unlock the account. The page claims the cash voucher will be “added to the user’s main Facebook account balance”, which is obviously not the case. Instead, the voucher number is transferred to the Carberp bot master who presumably uses it as a cash equivalent (Ukash provides anonymity similar to that offered by cash payments), thus effectively defrauding the user of 20 euro/$25.

Carberp Facebook Attack

This clever man-in-the-browser (MitB) attack exploits the trust users have with the Facebook website and the anonymity of e-cash vouchers. Unlike attacks against online banking applications that require transferring money to another account which creates an auditable trail, this new Carberp attack allows fraudsters to use or sell the e-cash vouchers immediately anywhere they are accepted on the internet.

Attacking social networks like Facebook provides cybercriminals with a large pool of victims that can be fairly easily tricked into divulging confidential account information, and even, as illustrated in this case, giving up their cash. With the growing adoption of e-cash on the internet, we expect to see more of these attacks. Like card not present fraud, where cybercriminals use stolen debit and credit card information to make illegal online purchases without the risk of being caught, e-cash fraud is a low risk form of crime. With e-cash, however, it is the account holder not the financial institution who assumes the liability for fraudulent transactions.

Jan 06 2012

Ramnit Worm Targets Facebook, Over 45,000 Accounts Compromised

Ramnit Worm FacebookMuch has been written about the Ramnit worm and its transformation into a financial malware. And now, Seculert’s research lab has discovered that Ramnit recently started targeting Facebook accounts with considerable success, stealing over 45,000 Facebook login credentials worldwide, mostly from people in the UK and France.

Discovered in April 2010, the Microsoft Malware Protection Center (MMPC) described Ramnit as “a multi-component malware family which infects Windows executable as well as HTML files”, “stealing sensitive information such as stored FTP credentials and browser cookies”. In July 2011 a Symantec report estimated that Ramnit worm variants accounted for 17.3 percent of all new malicious software infections.

In August 2011, Trusteer reported that Ramnit went ‘financial’. Following the leakage of the ZeuS source-code in May, it has been suggested that the hackers behind Ramnit merged several financial-fraud spreading capabilities to create a “Hybrid creature” which was empowered by both the scale of the Ramnit infection and the ZeuS financial data-sniffing capabilities.

With the recent ZeuS Facebook worm and this latest Ramnit variant, it appears that sophisticated hackers are now experimenting with replacing the old-school email worms with more up-to-date social network worms. As demonstrated by the 45,000 compromised Facebook subscribers, the viral power of social networks can be manipulated to cause considerable damage to individuals and institutions when it is in the wrong hands.

Seculert has provided Facebook with all of the stolen credentials that were found on the Ramnit servers.