Posts tagged: DNS Hacking

Feb 27 2013

ARPwner – ARP & DNS Poisoning Attack Tool

ARPwner is a tool to do ARP poisoning and DNS poisoning attacks, with a simple GUI and a plugin system to do filtering of the information gathered, also has a implementation of sslstrip and is coded 100% in python and on Github, so you can modify according to your needs.

arpwner

This tool was released by Nicolas Trippar at BlackHat USA 2012.

For the tool to work you need pypcap, so assuming are using a Debian derivative OS (like all sane people do) – you’ll need to do this first:

“apt-get install python-pypcap”

Download: ARPwner.zip

Read More: ARPwner @ GitHub

Jul 11 2012

How DNSChanger Malware Works

DNSChangerDNSChanger is malicious software (malware) that changes a user’s Domain Name System (DNS) settings, in order to divert traffic to unsolicited and potentially illegal sites.

Beginning in 2007, the cyber ring responsible for DNSChanger operated under the company name “Rove Digital” and used the malware to manipulate users’ Web activity by redirecting unsuspecting users to rogue DNS servers hosted in Estonia, New York, and Chicago. In some cases, the malware had the additional effect of preventing users’ anti-virus software and operating systems from updating, thereby exposing infected machines to even more malicious software.

FBI has since seized the rogue DNS servers and the botnet’s command-and-control (C&C) servers as part of “Operation Ghost Click” and the servers are now under their control. To assist victims affected by the DNSChanger, the FBI obtained a court order authorising the Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) to deploy and maintain temporary legitimate DNS servers, replacing the Rove Digital malicious network. As mentioned earlier, this is by no means a permanent solution and does not remove malware from infected systems; it just provides additional time for victims to clean affected computers and restore their normal DNS settings. According to the court order-which expired on 9 July 2012-the clean DNS servers will be turned off and computers still infected by DNSChanger malware may lose Internet connectivity.

To put this into perspective, DNS is an Internet service that converts user-friendly domain names into the numerical IP addresses that computers use to talk to each other. When you enter a domain name into your Web browser address bar, your computer contacts DNS servers to determine the IP address for the website you are intending to visit. Your computer then uses this IP address to locate and connect to the website. DNS servers are operated by your Internet service provider (ISP) and are included in your computer’s network configuration.

DNS Work DNSChanger Work
How DNS Works How DNSChanger Works

With the ability to change a computer’s DNS settings, malware authors can control what websites a computer connects to on the Internet and can force a compromised computer to connect to a fraudulent website or redirect the computer away from an intended website. To do that, a malware author needs to compromise a computer with malicious code, which in this case is DNSChanger. Once the computer is compromised, the malware modifies the DNS settings from the ISP’s legitimate DNS server’s address to the rogue DNS server’s address, in this case, advertisement websites.

A task force has been created, called the DNSChanger Working Group (DCWG), to help people determine if their computers have been compromised by this threat and to also help them remove the threat.

Jan 25 2012

Attackers Using DNS Poisoning to Hijack Domains, Divert Traffic

DNS PoisoningSeveral “activist hackers” appear to be using DNS poisoning and other attacks against the Domain Name System to divert users away from legitimate sites.

Instead of just launching distributed denial-of-service attacks, cyber-attackers have started hijacking domain names and redirecting traffic from legitimate sites to malicious ones.

The hacker group Anonymous recently managed to hijack the Domain Name System record for CBS.com and redirected all traffic to another Web server that displayed an empty directory structure. It appeared as if the contents of CBS.com had been wiped, but it was actually a different server altogether. CBS.com managed to regain control of its domain after the DNS poisoning attack.

A group of attackers called UGNazi, which may or may not have Anonymous sympathies, was behind a similar attack on the Website of the Ultimate Fighting Championship over the weekend. The UFC had supported the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act bills, which are now temporarily shelved in Congress. The same group hijacked two domains belonging to luxury handbag and leather goods retailer Coach and diverted the traffic.

“We arn’t done…not even close,” the attackers wrote on their Website. A short list of “targets” on the site explained the attacks were a result of the organizations’ support of SOPA.

Both Coach and UFC registered their domains through Network Solutions. It was evident the attackers had accessed Network Solutions’ domain management accounts. While it was unclear how they had done so, the cause is usually weak or compromised user passwords or a vulnerability in the registrar’s Website.

SOPA-related attacks continued this week and don’t appear to be abating. Anonymous attacked OnGuardOnline, a government-managed Website devoted to keeping users secure online. Some Anonymous members said the OnGuardOnline attack was in retaliation for SOPA and PIPA, as well as the proposed international agreement on combating online piracy, according to a message posted Jan. 23 on text-sharing site Pastebin,.

“If SOPA/PIPA/ACTA passes we will wage a relentless war against the corporate Internet, destroying dozens upon dozens of government and company Websites,” the message read.

Dec 20 2011

DeSopa – DNS Evasion to Stop Oppressive Policy in America

DeSopa Firefox AddOnPowerful special interests are attempting to force legislation for tighter control of the Internet, because they believe such legislation will preserve their power. The bill they have sponsored, SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act), not only has severe consequences for the Internet, it doesn’t even achieve their objectives.

The internet creates market efficiencies that forces industries to adapt, thus pushing forward progress for humanity as a whole. Public freedoms should not be curtailed and the Internet, built by the masses, should not be destroyed, so that a powerful few may have a false sense of security that their business models are sustainable without technological evolution.

This program is a proof of concept that SOPA will not help prevent piracy. The program, implemented as a Firefox extension, simply contacts offshore domain name resolution services to obtain the IP address for any desired website, and accesses those websites directly via IP. Similar offshore resolution services will eventually maintain their own cache of websites, without blacklisting, in order to meet the demand created by SOPA.

If SOPA is implemented, thousands of similar and more innovative programs and services will sprout up to provide access to the websites that people frequent. SOPA is a mistake. It does not even technically help solve the underlying problem, as this software illustrates. What it will do is give undue leverage to predatory organizations, cripple innocent third party websites, severely dampen digital innovation and negatively impact the integrity and security of the Internet.

Please bring this to the attention of congressmen responsible for voting on SOPA. SOPA will not technically achieve its stated objectives. Anyone voting in favor of it is morally responsible for destroying the freedoms, innovation, hard work and aspirations of many.

HOW TO USE
– Enable the Status/Add-on bar if it is not enabled (View->Toolbars->Add-on bar)
– Click on the light blue DeSopa button in the Status/Add-on bar, at the bottom of the browser window, to access websites by IP.
– Click the green DeSopa button to switch back to DNS resolution.

KNOWN LIMITATIONS
– Can only resolve tabs one at a time.
– First time resolution is a bit slow because three services are checked serially and compared. This may be done in parallel in the future, or a trusted single source may be used.

HOW IT WORKS
When turned on, DeSopa intercepts URLs, sends the base URL to three offshore DNS services via HTTP, makes a best effort to check that two of them are equivalent, caches the IP for the browser session, redirects to the equivalent URL using the IP, and substitutes out the domain name in the source code with the IP address for future requests.

Add to Firefox: DeSopa 1.2