Posts tagged: Apple iPhone

Oct 01 2013

New Touch ID Hack Allows to Unlock iPhone by Multiple FingerPrints

iPhone 5S Touch ID HackThe Iranian group defeated the very basic phenomenon of an iPhone Fingerprinting scanner, which allows them to unlock an iPhone device with multiple Fingerprints.

Apple‘s iPhone 5s, was launched just available in stores two weeks before with a new feature of biometrics-based security system called “Touch ID”, that involves analyzing a user’s fingerprint and using that to unlock the phone.

Apple launched the technology that it promises will better protect devices from criminals and snoopers seeking access. With this you can purchase things from the iTunes App Store. Basically, you can now use it in place of your password.

“Fingerprint is one of the best passcodes in the world. It’s always with you, and no two are exactly alike,” according to the Apple’s website.

Last week Germany Hackers showed that how they were able to deceive Apple’s latest security feature into believing they’re someone they’re not, using a well-honed technique for creating a latex copy of someone’s fingerprint.

Another interesting fact is that, Touch ID is not only designed to scan the fingerprints of your fingers, it works with various human body parts and appendages which are also not fingers.

In a video demonstration, the Group set up a mixed Fingerprint scan of 5-6 people for an iPhone 5S handset (as shown in the video), which allowed all of them to unlock the locked device with their individual fingerprint.

According to Apple, the chance that Touch ID will misread a finger is 1 in 50,000 , this is because Touch ID is not designed to capture the fingerprint in strict mode. It scans the fingerprint on a very high-resolution (2400 dpi), to get and match the partial parts of an impression for faster unlocking.

If the iPhone is not able to scan the thumb impression in the strict mode to be unique, there is a possibility that out of 1000 thumb impressions iPhone’s Touch ID system can count 2-3 impressions as of the same person.

Dec 16 2011

Apple Crash Reports to Jailbreak iPhone

Apple Jailbreak ExploitThousands of iPhone owners have joined forces with a team of hackers to help them find new ways to jailbreak Apple’s phone software.

Jailbreaking involves unlocking a device so that it is not restricted to running software officially approved by the manufacturer.

Mobile phones that run Google’s Android operating system do not face this restriction and Microsoft allows its Windows Phone 7 operating system to be unlocked. But Apple has always fought very hard to prevent anyone jailbreaking its devices.

The latest version of the iPhone’s operating system is proving to be extremely hard to jailbreak fully, according to Joshua Hill, a member of the Chronic Dev hacker team.

“Apple is really making it tough for us. The iPhone is now better protected than most nuclear missile facilities,” he says.

Bug Hunt
Bugs may result in a program crashing or shutting down, and they are like gold dust to hackers because sometimes they can be exploited to create a jailbreak.

To help prevent this, Apple’s phones record details of program crashes and send these reports back to the company. Apple’s programmers can then analyse the crash reports and fix any underlying bugs that pose serious security risks.

Crash Reports
The solution to this problem is to subvert Apple’s crash reporting capability by turning it against the company, he says.

“Chronic Dev is ready to turn this little information battle into an all-out, no-holds-barred information WAR,” Mr Hill wrote on the Chronic-Dev blog recently, using his nom de guerre Posixninja.

To do this he has written and distributed a program called CDevreporter that iPhone users can download to their PC or Mac. The program intercepts crash reports from their phones destined for Apple and sends them to the Chronic Dev team.

“In the first couple of days after we released CDevreporter we received about twelve million crash reports,” he says.

Legal Breaks
Jailbreaking phones is legal in the United States, thanks to a ruling in July 2010 by the Library of Congress – an agency that carries out legal research for the US government.

“There’s nothing Apple can do that would make jailbreaking impossible,” he says.

“Apple will always add new features to its phones, and there will always be bugs in its software. It’s just a matter of find the right ones.”