Jan 27 2012

theHarvester – Information Gathering Tool

The HarvestertheHarvester is a tool for gathering e-mail accounts, user names and hostnames/subdomains from different public sources like search engines and PGP key servers.

This tools is intended to help Penetration testers in the early stages of the project It’s a really simple tool, but very effective.

The sources supported are:
– Google – emails,subdomains/hostnames
– Google profiles – Employee names
– Bing search – emails, subdomains/hostnames,virtual hosts
– Pgp servers – emails, subdomains/hostnames
– Linkedin – Employee names
– Exalead – emails,subdomain/hostnames

New features:
– Time delays between requests
– XML and HTML results export
– Search a domain in all sources
– Virtual host verifier
– Shodan computer database integration
– Active enumeration (DNS enumeration,DNS reverse lookups, DNS TLD expansion)
– Basic graph with stats

Some Examples:
Searching emails accounts for the domain microsoft.com, it will work with the first 500 google results:

./theharvester.py -d microsoft.com -l 500 -b google

Searching emails accounts for the domain microsoft.com in a PGP server, here it’s not necessary to specify the limit.

./theharvester.py -d microsoft.com -b pgp

Searching for user names that works in the company microsoft, we use google as search engine, so we need to specify the limit of results we want to use:

./theharvester.py -d microsoft.com -l 200 -b linkedin

Searching in all sources at the same time, with a limit of 200 results:

./theHarvester.py -d microsoft.com -l 200 -b all

Download: https://code.google.com/p/theharvester

Jan 26 2012

FBI will Monitor Social Media using Crawl Application

FBI Monitor FacebookThe Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking for a better way to spy on Facebook and Twitter users.

The Bureau is asking companies to build software that can effectively scan social media online for significant words, phrases and behavior so that agents can respond.

A paper posted on the FBI website asks for companies to build programs that will map sentiment and wrongdoing.

“The application must be infinitely flexible and have the ability to adapt quickly to changing threats to maintain the strategic and tactical advantage,” the Request for Information said, “The purpose of this effort is to meet the outlined objectives…for the enhancement [of] FBI SOIC’s overall situation awareness and improved strategic decision making.”The tool would be used in “reconnaisance and surveillance missions, National Special Security Events (NSS) planning, NSSE operations, SOIC operations, counter intelligence, terrorism, and more.

Although the police, including in Britain, already use Facebook routinely to ascertain the whereabouts of criminals, automatically filtering out irrelevant information remains challenging. The new FBI application will be able to automatically highlight the most relevant information.

The FBI is seeking responses by 10 February.

Jan 25 2012

Attackers Using DNS Poisoning to Hijack Domains, Divert Traffic

DNS PoisoningSeveral “activist hackers” appear to be using DNS poisoning and other attacks against the Domain Name System to divert users away from legitimate sites.

Instead of just launching distributed denial-of-service attacks, cyber-attackers have started hijacking domain names and redirecting traffic from legitimate sites to malicious ones.

The hacker group Anonymous recently managed to hijack the Domain Name System record for CBS.com and redirected all traffic to another Web server that displayed an empty directory structure. It appeared as if the contents of CBS.com had been wiped, but it was actually a different server altogether. CBS.com managed to regain control of its domain after the DNS poisoning attack.

A group of attackers called UGNazi, which may or may not have Anonymous sympathies, was behind a similar attack on the Website of the Ultimate Fighting Championship over the weekend. The UFC had supported the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act bills, which are now temporarily shelved in Congress. The same group hijacked two domains belonging to luxury handbag and leather goods retailer Coach and diverted the traffic.

“We arn’t done…not even close,” the attackers wrote on their Website. A short list of “targets” on the site explained the attacks were a result of the organizations’ support of SOPA.

Both Coach and UFC registered their domains through Network Solutions. It was evident the attackers had accessed Network Solutions’ domain management accounts. While it was unclear how they had done so, the cause is usually weak or compromised user passwords or a vulnerability in the registrar’s Website.

SOPA-related attacks continued this week and don’t appear to be abating. Anonymous attacked OnGuardOnline, a government-managed Website devoted to keeping users secure online. Some Anonymous members said the OnGuardOnline attack was in retaliation for SOPA and PIPA, as well as the proposed international agreement on combating online piracy, according to a message posted Jan. 23 on text-sharing site Pastebin,.

“If SOPA/PIPA/ACTA passes we will wage a relentless war against the corporate Internet, destroying dozens upon dozens of government and company Websites,” the message read.

Jan 24 2012

QR Codes Being Exploited by Hackers to Distribute Malware

QR Code HackHackers are using QR codes to distribute malware to smartphone owners, says AVG.

According to the security firm’s AVG Community Powered Threat Report – Q4 2011, QR codes are becoming more popular with mobile users when it comes to accessing web pages or information without the need for typing in text or a URL, as the codes can simply be scanned by a handset and then automatically direct the user to the information. However, hackers are beginning to exploit this popularity as the user does not know what lurks behind the QR code until the malware is already installed and running on their device.

“In Q4 we clearly saw the convergence between computers and mobile phones applies to malware too. As phones become more like computers, so do the risks,” said Yuval Ben-Itzhak, Chief Technology Officer, AVG Technologies.

“Many sophisticated tricks of the trade from computers are now being repurposed for phones. However, as phones are often tied into billing systems the gains can be far greater.”

AVG also revealed 2011 saw a surge in the number of Android malware samples detected as well as the number of smartphones running Google’s operating system. Furthermore, stolen digital certificates, which are used to trick a user into believing the application is genuine, are also being used to target mobile device owners along with Rootkits, which AVG said are “evolving to be much more sophisticated”.

The security firm said the Blackhole toolkit is currently the most active threat on the web, accounting for half of all detected instances and over 80 percent of all toolkits found this quarter. The USA remains the largest source of spam, but is now followed by the UK, which jumped from fourth to second place overtaking India and Brazil this quarter.

Jan 23 2012

Tor – Multiple Vulnerabilities

Tor LogoMultiple vulnerabilities have been found in Tor, the most severe of which may allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code.

Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Tor:

  • When configured as client or bridge, Tor uses the same TLS certificate chain for all outgoing connections (CVE-2011-2768).
  • When configured as a bridge, Tor relays can distinguish incoming bridge connections from client connections (CVE-2011-2769).
  • An error in or/buffers.c could result in a heap-based buffer overflow (CVE-2011-2778).

Impact:
A remote attacker could possibly execute arbitrary code or cause a Denial of Service. Furthermore, a remote relay the user is directly connected to may be able to disclose anonymous information about that user or enumerate bridges in the user’s connection.

Vulnerable Versions:
< 0.2.2.35

Workaround:
There is no known workaround at this time.

Resolution:
All Tor users should upgrade to the latest version:

# emerge –sync
# emerge –ask –oneshot –verbose “>=net-misc/tor-0.2.2.35″

References:
CVE-2011-2768
CVE-2011-2769
CVE-2011-2778