Category: Password Hacking

Jan 06 2015

Wifiphisher – Fast Automated Phishing Attack Tool for WiFi Networks

wifiphisherWifiphisher is a security tool that mounts fast automated phishing attacks against WPA networks in order to obtain the secret passphrase. It is a social engineering attack that unlike other methods it does not include any brute forcing. It is an easy way for obtaining WPA credentials.

From the victim’s perspective, the attack makes use in three phases:

1] Victim is being deauthenticated from her access point: Wifiphisher continuously jams all of the target access point’s wifi devices within range by sending deauth packets to the client from the access point, to the access point from the client, and to the broadcast address as well.

2] Victim joins a rogue access point: Wifiphisher sniffs the area and copies the target access point’s settings. It then creates a rogue wireless access point that is modeled on the target. It also sets up a NAT/DHCP server and forwards the right ports. Consequently, because of the jamming, clients will start connecting to the rogue access point. After this phase, the victim is MiTMed.

MiTM Attack

3] Victim is being served a realistic router config-looking page: Wifiphisher employs a minimal web server that responds to HTTP & HTTPS requests. As soon as the victim requests a page from the Internet, wifiphisher will respond with a realistic fake page that asks for WPA password confirmation due to a router firmware upgrade.

Requirements:
― Kali Linux
― Two wireless network interfaces, one capable of injection.

Wifiphisher works on Kali Linux and is licensed under the MIT license.

More Info: sophron/wifiphisher – GitHub

Jan 22 2014

’123456′ Declared Worst Internet Password of 2013

Worst Passwords 2013 The 2013 list of worst passwords, influenced by postings from the Adobe breach, demonstrates the importance of not basing passwords on the application or website being accessed.

SplashData has announced its annual list of the 25 most common passwords found on the Internet. For the first time since SplashData began compiling its annual list, “password” has lost its title as the most common and therefore Worst Password, and two-time runner-up “123456″ took the dubious honor. “Password” fell to #2.

According to SplashData, this year’s list was influenced by the large number of passwords from Adobe users posted online by security consulting firm Stricture Consulting Group following Adobe’s well publicized security breach.

“Seeing passwords like ‘adobe123′ and ‘photoshop’ on this list offers a good reminder not to base your password on the name of the website or application you are accessing,” says Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData.

SplashData’s list of frequently used passwords shows that many people continue to put themselves at risk by using weak, easily guessable passwords. Some other passwords in the Top Ten include “qwerty,” “abc123,” “111111,” and “iloveyou.”

“Another interesting aspect of this year’s list is that more short numerical passwords showed up even though websites are starting to enforce stronger password policies,” Slain said. For example, new to this year’s list are simple and easily guessable passwords like “1234″ at #16, “12345″ at #20, and “000000″ at #25.

Sources:
1] SplashData News – Worst Passwords of 2013
2] Stricture Group – Top 100 Adobe Passwords with Count

Apr 10 2013

Social Engineering Skype Support to Hack any Account Instantly

Skype Social Engineering AttacksYou can install the industry’s strongest and most expensive firewall. You can educate employees about basic security procedures and the importance of choosing strong passwords. You can even lock-down the server room, but how do you protect a company from the threat of social engineering attacks?

For any of you that are involved in security awareness efforts, you know what I am talking about. It could happen tomorrow, it could happen today or it might already have happened.

In a recent disclosure posted by renowned hacker and developer DarkCoderSc (Jean-Pierre LESUEUR) explained that how one can easily Socially Engineer Microsoft Skype Support team to get access to any skype account.

From a social engineering perspective, employees are the weak link in the chain of security measures in place. He simply used the weakness of Skype password recovery system itself.

One simply need to request a new password to Skype support and asking to change the password. After the initial step one needs to proof the real ownership of the account requested. You must give 5 contacts accounts to the support desk.

That’s easy because you just have to add 5 fake temporary accounts to the target account and its done. Another option is to simply ask the target what people he know on Skype. That option wasn’t that hard because I have over 1000 contacts.” he suggests the trick.

Within few seconds attacker can become owner of any victim account by proving very basic information to support team.

Also Microsoft’s Support Team should make a serious effort to communicate better to their customers. At the moment they do not seem to care that much about their customers.

Feb 02 2013

Twitter Hacked – 250,000 Accounts Compromised

Twitter HackedIn a blog post last Friday, Twitter’s Director of Information Security Bob Lord, said the company had discovered a major attack and shut it down almost immediately, but the attackers may have had access to user names, email addresses, session tokens and passwords for approximately 250,000 users.

Lord said that Twitter detected unusual access patterns that led to it identifying unauthorised access attempts to Twitter user data.

“We discovered one live attack and were able to shut it down in process moments later. As a precautionary security measure, we have reset passwords and revoked session tokens for these accounts. If your account was one of them, you will have recently received (or will shortly) an email from us at the address associated with your Twitter account notifying you that you will need to create a new password. Your old password will not work when you try to log in to Twitter.

Though only a very small percentage of our users were potentially affected by this attack, we encourage all users to take this opportunity to ensure that they are following good password hygiene, on Twitter and elsewhere on the Internet. Make sure you use a strong password – at least ten (but more is better) characters and a mixture of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols – that you are not using for any other accounts or sites.

Using the same password for multiple online accounts significantly increases your odds of being compromised. If you are not using good password hygiene, take a moment now to change your Twitter passwords. We also echo the advisory from the US Department of Homeland Security and security experts to encourage users to disable Java on their computers in their browsers”.

The attack follows hacks into a number of major media outlets, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Unnamed sources quoted by the newspapers say they suspect Chinese hackers, possibly associated with the Chinese government, to be involved.

Twitter have not mention that how hackers were able to infiltrate Twitter’s systems, but Twitter’s blog post alluded that hackers had broken in through a zero-day vulnerability in Oracle’s Java software.

Jan 20 2012

Patator – Multi-Purpose Brute Forcing Tool

Brute Force AttackPatator is a multi-purpose brute-forcer, with a modular design and a flexible usage.

Currently it supports the following modules:

  • ftp_login : Brute-force FTP
  • ssh_login : Brute-force SSH
  • telnet_login : Brute-force Telnet
  • smtp_login : Brute-force SMTP
  • smtp_vrfy : Enumerate valid users using the SMTP VRFY command
  • smtp_rcpt : Enumerate valid users using the SMTP RCPT TO command
  • http_fuzz : Brute-force HTTP/HTTPS
  • pop_passd : Brute-force poppassd (not POP3)
  • ldap_login : Brute-force LDAP
  • smb_login : Brute-force SMB
  • mssql_login : Brute-force MSSQL
  • oracle_login : Brute-force Oracle
  • mysql_login : Brute-force MySQL
  • pgsql_login : Brute-force PostgreSQL
  • vnc_login : Brute-force VNC
  • dns_forward : Forward lookup subdomains
  • dns_reverse : Reverse lookup subnets
  • snmp_login : Brute-force SNMPv1/2 and SNMPv3
  • unzip_pass : Brute-force the password of encrypted ZIP files
  • keystore_pass : Brute-force the password of Java keystore files

Download: patator_v0.3.py

Project Home: http://code.google.com/p/patator/