Category: Hacking Tips Tricks

Apr 10 2013

Social Engineering Skype Support to Hack any Account Instantly

Skype Social Engineering AttacksYou can install the industry’s strongest and most expensive firewall. You can educate employees about basic security procedures and the importance of choosing strong passwords. You can even lock-down the server room, but how do you protect a company from the threat of social engineering attacks?

For any of you that are involved in security awareness efforts, you know what I am talking about. It could happen tomorrow, it could happen today or it might already have happened.

In a recent disclosure posted by renowned hacker and developer DarkCoderSc (Jean-Pierre LESUEUR) explained that how one can easily Socially Engineer Microsoft Skype Support team to get access to any skype account.

From a social engineering perspective, employees are the weak link in the chain of security measures in place. He simply used the weakness of Skype password recovery system itself.

One simply need to request a new password to Skype support and asking to change the password. After the initial step one needs to proof the real ownership of the account requested. You must give 5 contacts accounts to the support desk.

That’s easy because you just have to add 5 fake temporary accounts to the target account and its done. Another option is to simply ask the target what people he know on Skype. That option wasn’t that hard because I have over 1000 contacts.” he suggests the trick.

Within few seconds attacker can become owner of any victim account by proving very basic information to support team.

Also Microsoft’s Support Team should make a serious effort to communicate better to their customers. At the moment they do not seem to care that much about their customers.

Oct 27 2011

Facebook Attach EXE Vulnerability

Summary:
When using the Facebook ‘Messages’ tab, there is a feature to attach a file. Using this feature normally, the site won’t allow a user to attach an executable file. A bug was discovered to subvert this security mechanisms. Note, you do NOT have to be friends with the user to send them a message with an attachment.

Description:
When attaching an executable file, Facebook will return an error message stating:
“Error Uploading: You cannot attach files of that type.”

Facebook Error Uploading

When uploading a file attachment to Facebook we captured the web browsers POST request being sent to the web server. Inside this POST request reads the line:

Content-Disposition: form-data; name=”attachment”; filename=”cmd.exe”

It was discovered the variable ‘filename’ was being parsed to determine if the file type is allowed or not.

To subvert the security mechanisms to allow an .exe file type, we modified the POST request by appending a space to our filename variable like so:

filename=”cmd.exe ”

Facebook Post Hack

This was enough to trick the parser and allow our executable file to be attached and sent in a message.

Facebook Hot Stuff

Impact:
Potentially allow an attacker to compromise a victim’s computer system.

Affected Products:
www.facebook.com

Time Table:
09/30/2011 Reported Vulnerability to the Vendor
10/26/2011 Vendor Acknowledged Vulnerability
10/27/2011 Publicly Disclosed

Credits:
Discovered by Nathan Power
www.securitypentest.com

Execution POC:

Oct 06 2011

SpyEye Banking Trojan – Now with SMS Hijacking Capability

SpyEye TrojanThe Trusteer research team recently uncovered a stealth new attack carried out by the SpyEye Trojan that circumvents mobile SMS (short message service) security measures implemented by many banks. Using code captured while protecting a Rapport user, researchers discovered a two-step web-based attack that allows fraudsters to change the mobile phone number in a victim’s online banking account and reroute SMS confirmation codes used to verify online transactions. This attack, when successful, enables the thieves to make transactions on the user’s account and confirm the transactions without the user’s knowledge.

Step 1:
In the first step of the attack, SpyEye steals the victim’s online banking login details. This is standard operating procedure for financial malware like SpyEye, Zeus, and others. The fraudsters can now access the victim’s account without raising any red flags that would be picked up by fraud detection systems.

Step 2:
In Step 2, SpyEye changes the victim’s phone number of record in the online banking application to one of several random attacker controlled numbers. In order to complete this operation the attacker needs the confirmation code which is sent by the bank to the customer’s original phone number. To steal this confirmation code the attacker uses the following social engineering scheme.

First, SpyEye injects a fraudulent page in the customer’s browser that appears to be from the online banking application. The fake page purports to introduce a new security system that is now “required” by the bank and for which customers must register. The page explains that under this new security process the customer will be assigned a unique telephone number and that they will receive a special SIM card via mail. Next, the user is instructed to enter the personal confirmation number they receive on their mobile telephone into the fake web page in order to complete the registration process for the new security system. This allows the criminals to steal the confirmation code they need to authorize changing the customer’s mobile number.

Now the fraudsters can receive all future SMS transaction verification codes for the hijacked account via their own telephone network. This allows them to use the SMS confirmation system to divert funds from the customer’s account without their knowledge, while not triggering any fraud detection alarms.

Sep 25 2011

Doppelganger Domain Attack

Doppelganger Domain AttackDomain typo-squatting is commonly used to spread malware to users whom accidentally misspell a legitimate domain in their web browser. A new type of domain typo-squatting takes advantage of an omission instead of a misspelling.

A Doppelganger Domain is a domain spelled identical to a legitimate fully qualified domain name (FQDN) but missing the dot between host/subdomain and domain, to be used for malicious purposes. Doppelganger Domains have a potent impact via email as attackers could gather information such as trade secrets, user names and passwords, and other employee information.

Each company in the Fortune 500 was profiled for susceptibility to Doppelganger Domains and 151 companies (or 30%) were found to be susceptible. In large corporations, email usage is extremely high and the likelihood of some email being mis-sent is high which could result in data leakage.

Security researcher Peter Kim and Garrett Gee who set up doppelganger domains to mimic legitimate domains belonging to Fortune 500 companies say they managed to vacuum up 20 gigabytes of misaddressed e-mail over six months. The intercepted correspondence included employee usernames and passwords, sensitive security information about the configuration of corporate network architecture that would be useful to hackers, affidavits and other documents related to litigation in which the companies were embroiled, and trade secrets, such as contracts for business transactions.

WhitePaper : Doppelganger.Domains.pdf

Aug 29 2011

Using Google Servers as a DDoS Tool

Google’s servers can be used by cyber attackers to launch DDoS attacks, claims Simone “R00T_ATI” Quatrini, a penetration tester for Italian security consulting firm AIR Sicurezza.

Google Servers

Quatrini discovered that two vulnerable pages – /_/sharebox/linkpreview/ and gadgets/proxy? – can be used to request any file type, which Google+ will download and show – even if the attacker isn’t logged into Google+.

By making many such request simultaneously – which he managed to do by using a shell script he’s written – he practically used Google’s bandwidth to orchestrate a small DDoS attack against a server he owns.

He points out that his home bandwidth can’t exceed 6Mbps, and that the use of Google’s server resulted in an output bandwidth of at least 91Mbps.

“The advantage of using Google and make requests through their servers, is to be even more anonymous when you attack some site (TOR+This method); The funny thing is that apache will log Google IPs,” says Quatrini. “But beware: igadgets/proxy? will send your IP in apache log, if you want to attack, you’ll need to use /_/sharebox/linkpreview/.”

He says he has discovered the flaws that allow the attack on August 10 and that he contacted Google’s Security center about it. After 19 days of receiving no reply from Google, he published his findings.